Behaviour Support Policy

The Hills Learning Centre Pty Ltd

The Hills Learning Centre recognises that quality support should be informed by good practice and sound research.  Consistent with a contemporary disability services approach, legislative requirements, and evidence-based practice, The Hills Learning Centre promotes a positive approach to learning and behaviour support.  Our positive approach to behaviour support is to provide a respectful and sensitive environment in which the student is empowered to achieve and maintain their individual learning goals.

The Hills Learning Centre has a responsibility to ensure that people who receive behaviour support are protected from exploitation, abuse, neglect and unlawful and degrading treatment.  The Hills Learning Centre undertakes a positive approach to behaviour support.  All teaching and activities related to behaviour support will be supportive and respectful of the student’s needs and goals, as identified through their individual Support Plan and based on their IEP.

The Hills Learning Centre undertakes services which are person-centred and outcome focused.  This places the student at the centre of learning, incorporating what can be learned about their lifestyle, skills, relationships, preferences, aspirations, and other significant characteristics, in order to provide appropriate, respectful and meaningful behaviour support in a holistic framework.

A focus on outcomes ensures that this support adequately addresses the changing needs of the student.  The Hills Learning Centre ensures a focus on strategies which aim to prevent the occurrence of behaviours which challenge the support system.

Behaviour support will be provided with consideration of the student’s needs and capabilities.  Consideration will also be based around Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds, and from culturally and linguistically diverse communities.  The Behavioural Support Plan provides clear guidelines on how to implement preventative and reactive strategies.  In order to ensure the effectiveness of the Behavioural Support Plan, these recommendations will be constantly reviewed and are up-dated in line with the feedback from students and tutors and in-line with the changing support needs of the student.

Challenging behaviour will not be interpreted automatically as an expression of defiance by the student but viewed rather with reference to wider contextual factors.

CONDITIONS FOR PROVISION OF A BEHAVIOUR MANAGAMENT PLAN

A behaviour management plan specifically addresses the needs of a participant in accordance with this policy.  A behaviour management plan may be appropriate where:

  1. There are reasonable concerns over risk of harm or serious injury to the student or to others.
  2. Existing strategies have not been effective in managing the behaviour;
  3. There are concerns over the use of existing strategies for other reasons;
  4. The challenging behaviour appears to prevent other significant needs to be met;
  5. Existing strategies appear to prevent significant needs being met;

Approach and Accommodations:

  1. Instruction methods used during sessions will involve modelling; hand-on-hand; cueing/prompting; scaffolding; independent. (“I do- we do- you do”)
  2. Reinforcements used to promote desirable behaviour include social praise; stickers; activity privilege.
  3. Attention to negative behaviours is minimised and student is re-directed to replacement and appropriate behaviours such as; using music, balls or other appropriate activity.
  4. If negative behaviour continues, after all efforts are made to identify and remove the antecedent of the behaviour; a firm verbal ‘no’ or ‘stop’ accompanied with the ‘stop’ hand-signal will be used.
  5. Should the behaviour continue and either, the child, other student or staff be at risk, the session will be suspended; all dangers removed; and the parent/carer will be asked to intervene to assist in calming down the student before removing the student for home.
  6. If force or restraint is necessary to prevent harm the NSW Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act (1998) permits the use of reasonable force to achieve this however should be applied for no longer than necessary to prevent or contain the danger.
  7. Following the incident, steps should be taken to have a Behaviour Management Plan made or an existing one altered.

Consent

Implementation of behaviour support strategies requires the informed consent of the student where they have capacity, and the parent, or person with parental responsibility as appropriate.

The behaviour support plan as developed by The Hills Learning Centre will support the goals outlined by NDIS planners.  This will include the support of time-frames and regular reviews and assessments. Section 158 of the Act permits persons having parental responsibility and authorised carers to physically restrain a child or young person, involving reasonable force.

Crisis Response Incident

A crisis response may be required in situations where there is clear and immediate risk of harm linked to behaviour(s) and there is no Behaviour Management Plan in place. In such circumstances immediate intervention may be considered necessary under The Hills Learning Centre duty of care.

A Crisis Response may require the use of a restricted practice to prevent serious self-injury or harm to another person.  The Crisis Response should involve the minimum amount of restriction or force necessary and for only as long as necessary to manage the risk.

Following the incident, steps should be taken to have a Behaviour Management Plan made or altered.

Children and Young People

If force or restraint is necessary to prevent harm to a child or young person, the NSW Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act (1998) permits the use of reasonable force to achieve this.  It should be applied for no longer than necessary to prevent or contain the danger.  Section 158 of the Act permits persons having parental responsibility and authorised carers to physically restrain a child or young person, involving reasonable force.  However, this can only be employed on a temporary basis.

The Support System

Behaviour support services should aim at promoting, establishing and maintaining environments and interactions which promote resilience of the support system and deliver positive and sustainable outcomes for the student.

Those within the support system should be responsible for identifying any additional training and support needs relevant to their role within the support system.

Roles and Responsibilities

Staff at The Hills Learning Centre has a duty to follow documented behaviour support strategies endorsed by parents/carers and developed in accordance with this policy and in monitoring and reporting related outcomes.

Management: It is the role of The Hills Learning Centre management to promote environments in which positive behaviour outcomes for the student and their families can be realistically achieved.